Does your fitness tracker have a dark side?

By: Abbey Dufoe  |  April 7, 2015

Johnny Adamic at The Daily Beast thinks so. Adamic, a nationally-certified personal trainer and registered yoga teacher, argues why fitness accessories and apps could potentially have a dark side.

Adamic argues that “we don’t trust ourselves anymore. The act of exercise is no longer a mind-to-body experience but rather a mind-to-fitness-tracker-device-to-body phenomenon.” His argument stems from the fact that instead of listening to our bodies, we rely on technology to tell us when we need to drink, eat, or walk.

Also, Adamic believes fitness trackers all rely on “very limited metrics (steps taken, movement when you sleep, calorie tracking, heart rate monitor in some, and distance traveled with the movement) giving you a very skewed analysis about your health.” Instead, your health relies on much more, the list including genetics, culture, and daily habits, to name a few.

We are missing a pivotal step: self-reflection. It’s really easy to buy a Nike Fuel band and wear it. It’s much harder, however, to get deep with yourself.

Sure, this is introspective and a little abstract, but some would say Adamic has a point. However, others may say that their fitness trackers, including FitBit, JawBone, and upcoming release of the AppleWatch, might motivate people to keep moving and get outside and walk instead of drive, for example.

 

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