Symantec Swipes Boeing’s Big Data Engineers

By: Natalie Mootz  |  January 15, 2015


Poor Narus. First, the internet-filtering software company got nabbed by Boeing in 2010. Next thing they know, Symantec snapped up the cybersecurity unit last week for its own designs. Narus employs over 65 data scientists and other engineers who create software for intelligence agencies. Symantec is looking to Narus for its big data analytics as a weapon in the war against cyberattacks.

Despite its popular Norton Antivirus Suite, Symantec’s enterprise information security revenues have been sliding of late. To improve its global threat intelligence network, Symantec sought to buy Narus so it can create a cyberattack response team and sell its intelligence briefings. Acquiring Narus allows Symantec to sift big data into actionable intelligence. Amit Mital, Symantec’s Chief Technology Officer, explains that Narus adds “expertise in machine learning, security, big data analytics and networking to Symantec to help us develop our platform.”

What makes Narus so desirable is its real-time network traffic analytics The information can be used against cyber attacks and threats aimed at large Internet Protocol networks.

This isn’t Boeing’s first time to the business unit sell-off rodeo and it is keeping the intellectual properties and patents created by Narus during its tenure in the aircraft giant’s stable, likely to be sold or leased back to Symantec as needed.

But don’t feel too sorry for Narus. They must have some serious brainpower within their walls to create such big demand with global companies. In fact, they’re probably reading this post right now. Hello? Can you see me waving at you with Internet friendliness? Hey, maybe you can stop my Mac from asking me to upgrade to Yosemite every five minutes. Guys? Anyone?

See how stealthy they are!

If you’re in the market for some beefed up internet security, check out our reviews of Norton and other antivirus software here.

About Natalie Mootz

Natalie has been writing for the web since dinosaurs roamed the earth. Or at least since dinosaurs achieved blogging technology. She's also written for and Joystiq.


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